Nambi Narayanan: Justice for a Scientist

SPACE SCIENTIST Nambi Narayanan is waiting for the compensation that the Supreme Court recently ordered that he be paid for having been framed in a false espionage case. He needs the money to service his debts. “I am looking forward to the day the Kerala government hands me over a cheque of Rs 50 lakh … Continue reading Nambi Narayanan: Justice for a Scientist

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In His First Solo Show in Six Years, Sanjay Bhattacharyya Reimagines the Idea of Shrines

ONE OF THE most enduring images in public memory of Sanjay Bhattacharyya dates back to 2006, when the artist brandished a print of a fake painting of his guru Bikash Bhattacharjee that was being sold as an original by an auction house. Behind the artist, a poster read, ‘Artists Combined Movement Against Fake & Forged … Continue reading In His First Solo Show in Six Years, Sanjay Bhattacharyya Reimagines the Idea of Shrines

The Legacy War at Teen Murti Between Nehru’s Fans and Foes

SHAKTI SINHA IS in office as early as 8.30 in the morning and soon he is snowed in with back-to-back meetings. A seasoned bureaucrat who is remembered mostly for his days as private secretary to the late Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee, he takes the hectic routine in his stride. And when he meets you, … Continue reading The Legacy War at Teen Murti Between Nehru’s Fans and Foes

When the Monster Rains Came, Kerala Was Not Prepared

In Pathanamthitta district of Kerala, one of the worst affected regions in the biggest flood to hit the southern Indian state in almost a century, 72-year-old Chandrasekharan Achari died for want of medical assistance. He couldn’t be taken to the local hospital two kilometres from home because the water had risen so high that no … Continue reading When the Monster Rains Came, Kerala Was Not Prepared

How Vajpayee Straddled Two Worlds and Made Hindutva Palatable to the Masses

They say Atal Bihari Vajpayee was the right man in the wrong party. He wasn’t. Academics and independent political analysts such as Robin Jeffrey and Vajpayee’s contemporaries in politics remember him in the 1960s as a young, firebrand leader of the Hindutva cause, someone capable of the most offensive of anti-Muslim statements. A man groomed in the … Continue reading How Vajpayee Straddled Two Worlds and Made Hindutva Palatable to the Masses

Atal Bihari Vajpayee (1924-2018): The Beloved

On a deserted street outside Ahdoos Hotel in curfew-bound Srinagar on that distant afternoon of August 2016 from where I was heading towards Press Enclave, an elderly gentleman in a skullcap approached me, almost blocking my way, and began to talk animatedly in Hindi and English. He didn’t introduce himself, but I didn’t panic because … Continue reading Atal Bihari Vajpayee (1924-2018): The Beloved

“I Had to Understand Gandhi Myself” — In Conversation with Tushar, the Great-Grandson of Mahatma Gandhi

INSIDE HIS SPARTAN Mumbai home on the second floor of an ageing building with narrow, dark staircases and walls with peeling plaster that remind one of Fassbinder movies that portrayed life in post-World War Germany, Tushar Gandhi, great-grandson of the Mahatma, looks out of place. For a man of his size, bearing and composure, dressed … Continue reading “I Had to Understand Gandhi Myself” — In Conversation with Tushar, the Great-Grandson of Mahatma Gandhi

Wounded Soldiers from Civil War-Ravaged Yemen Get a Healing Touch in India

IN 2015, MOHAMMED Omer Mohsin was conscripted, trained and sent to fight a bloody war by his army within a matter of weeks. Everything happened in a flash. Then a lanky 20-year-old interested in football, math and Islamic studies, his circumstances began to change rapidly. It was unsettling, the way his country transformed overnight. From … Continue reading Wounded Soldiers from Civil War-Ravaged Yemen Get a Healing Touch in India

“Voters Are Intelligent Enough to Distinguish Between Politicians and Football” — In Conversation with Simon Kuper

SIMON KUPER IS one of the world’s most renowned football writers. A widely read Financial Times columnist, Kuper, who co-authored Soccernomics with sports economist Stefan Szymanski, had been working on region-specific editions of their best-selling work. Recently, they came out with a revised edition of the book, drawing upon new market inputs and data. The 48-year-old Uganda-born British writer, … Continue reading “Voters Are Intelligent Enough to Distinguish Between Politicians and Football” — In Conversation with Simon Kuper